Skip to main content

Help Desk FAQs

Frequently asked questions for your computing user account, operating system, and various software types.

  • FAQ Hero Image
  • User Account/System

    • Has My Computing Account Been Set Up?

      If you applied for a computing account and have not yet received notification that your account is set up, check your spam or clutter inbox to see if your account confirmation email has been directed there.

      You can also check your account’s processing status on this web page: https://accounts.computing.socialsciences.cornell.edu. Sign in using your Cornell netID and password. Select the “My Accounts” tab at the top to view the current status or your account.

      • If your account status is Approved and Pending, wait 10 minutes and check again. If the status has not changed, email CCSS-ResearchSupport@cornell.edu.
      • If your account is under Pending Approval, you will need to ask your affiliated faculty member to approve your account request via an email sent to them from CCSS-RS. In addition, some colleges are a part of the approval process and this may require an extra day or so.
    • Most common errors when using the web password reset tool:

      • The user does not exist or has not been enrolled in the SSRPM. (1168)
        • The account you are trying to set a password on is not currently active. To verify your current accounts, log in to the account tool and click “My Accounts” tab at top.
      • There are insufficient authentication methods (e.g. questions, PIN code) to reset your password. You might need to enroll again. (-53)
        • You have not registered an email address with CCSS-RS. Please notify CCSS-RS of your current email address.
      • An error occurred. Please contact your system administrator if the error persists. (-100)
        • You are entering domain\username. The password tool only wants the username.
        • For example: abc123_rs
      • An error occurred. Please contact your system administrator if the issue persists. (-2147023570)

      The is an issue with how the account was created. Please notify CCSS-RS.

    • When you are working on the CCSS Research Support servers you want to know that your work is being saved and backed up. By default files get saved to the C drive. Do not save work to the C Drive. Everything on the C drive gets cleared on a monthly basis. We can not retrieve files that get deleted if stored within the C drive. Example of C drive location follows. 

      Store your work onto your personal U drive. Anything there will be backed up. Locate U drive from within servers

      • Open the “File Explorer” Application
      • Click “This PC” on the left
      • Underneath “Network Locations” there is a work space labelled by your CCSS-RS username. Save files within the network drive named after your CCSS-RS username.
      • Documents, Desktop, Downloads are some examples of safe places within your U drive.

      More information about this in the following link. Your Work space

    • Servers are in working condition

  • Atlas.ti

    • Question: I cannot access my primary documents in Atlas.ti. I swear I saved the library containing my files on the U:\ drive, but now I couldn’t open the files.

      Answer: You, or our recent maintenance may have reset the location of your  library back to the default C drive. Set it back to its correct location by going to:

       

      1. Open Atlas.ti application. This will display welcome menu
      2. At bottom, click Options>ATLAS.ti Library Location>Switch Library Atlas.ti Screenshot

         

      3. Point the library to its correct location

      Contact foa2@cornell.edu if you have questions/clarifications.

    • CCSS Research Support has removed its installation of Stat Transfer software from our servers. Included below are instructions for converting data to different file formats without using Stat Transfer. Reasons for converting data to different formats include:

      • Export data to more user-friendly software for sending to fellow researchers.
      • Continue your research by further analyzing your data using a different programming language.

      Instructions

      Nearly all programming languages accept CSV data files. CSV stands for Comma Separated Values. CSV files can be opened and saved using excel as well as notepad for text. Making it a great file type for exporting and sharing. Below I include coding syntax, Example commands, Menu guidance and online documentation for exporting and importing CSV data for CCSS-RS most popular programs.

      Atlas.ti Exporting 

      Qualitative Software.
      Export entire Atlas.ti project using Menu:
      “File” -> “Export” -> “Project Bundle”
      “Import & Export” tab with more exporting details.

      Atlas.ti Exporting Projects Documentation

  • Python

    • To install Anaconda packages you must create a new virtual environment pointing to your U: drive. Information about the U: drive for your CCSS Research Support computing account can be found inside the link below.

       

      CCSS-RS Workspace

      Confirmed process working on RSCH105.ciserrsch.cornell.edu

      Creating Virtual Environment

      CONNECT TO CCSS-RS SERVERS. OPEN “ANACONDA PROMPT” FROM START MENU

      Do work within U: drive

      U:

      Set directory using “cd” command. Directory is folder on U: drive where my work is. In example below

      cd Documents

      Create new folder inside Documents.

      mkdir "conda_dir"

      cd "conda_dir"

      Create virtual environment. Will be created where directory was set to above. A folder “myenv” from code below will be created within “U:\Documents\conda_dir”

      conda create --prefix ./myenv python=3.9

      y

      Activate newly created virtual environment below

      activate "U:\Documents\conda_dir\myenv"

      y

      Install packages ‘gensim’ and ‘tensorflow’ as example. Use pip command to install

      pip install gensim

      pip install tensorflow

       

    • Incorporating Jupyter Notebook

      For this demo I will initiate jupyter notebook and use a package with sample code.

      Begin by following instructions above to create virtual environment. Install your desired package prior to starting jupyter notebook.

      Use pip command to install libraries to your virtual environment

      pip install keras

      pip install tensorflow

      Must install ipykernel to initiate from jupyter notebook from Anaconda command prompt

      conda install ipykernel

      Must install “jupyter” library to initiate from Anaconda command prompt

      pip install jupyter

      If pip install jupyter gives kernel dead. use pip uninstall jupyter, then use conda

      conda install jupyter

      Will use “random2” package for my sample code

      pip install random2

      Initiate jupyter notebook with command below

      jupyter notebook

      You may have .ipynb files scattered all over your filing system. You can initiate your environment from any folder so long as you specify the location

      jupyter notebook --notebook-dir U:/Documents

      Command above opens Jupyter with Documents as home directory. Now I can access any .ipynb files inside all folders within Documents. This can be done with Desktop, Downloads, ect.

      Some information gotten from following link.

      Pythonforundergradengineers.com

       

      Incorporating Jupyter Lab

      Begin by following instructions above to create virtual environment. Use pip command to install libraries to your virtual environment

      pip install jupyterlab

      type ‘jupyter lab’ to initiate. Make sure to open using Firefox or Microsoft Edge browsers, Internet Explorer does not support jupyter lab

      jupyter lab

      Take localhost link in screenshot below and paste into acceptable browser, Firefox or Microsoft Edge. Below is example of localhost URL from screenshot below:

      http://localhost:8888/?token=6f0251d09cbd560c97b38faacfd4ddb040dec8d167c770c0

      Python Instructions

      • Jupyter lab opened in acceptable browser

      Python Instructions

      Sample Program

      Once jupyter notebook has opened within a web browser use the program below to test. This program is dependent on the library “random2”, install in commands above.

      #!/usr/bin/env python

      import random # Get a random number generator.

      NTRIALS = 10000 # Enough trials to get an reasonably accurate answer.

      NPEOPLE = 30 # How many people in the group?

      matches = 0 # Keep track of how many trials have matching birthdays.

      for trial in range(NTRIALS): 12# Do a bunch of trials...

      taken = {} # A place to keep track of which birthdays

      # are already taken on this trial.

      for person in range(NPEOPLE): 60# Put the people’s birthdays down, one at a time...

      day = random.randint(0, 365) # On a randomly chosen day.

      if day in taken:4

      matches += 1 # A match! # No need to look for more than one.

      taken[day] = 1 # Mark the day as taken.

      print("The fraction of trials that have matching birthdays is", float(matches)/NTRIALS)

      Using Spyder

      Open Anaconda prompt.

      Activate directory using steps at beginning of article.

      Must install ipykernel to initiate from jupyter notebook from Anaconda command prompt

      conda install ipykernel

      pip install spyder

      pip install jedi

      conda install ipykernel

      Use pip command to install other libraries to your virtual environment

      pip install random2

      Initiate Spyder application with command below spyder

      Run test program dependent on random2 library.

      #!/usr/bin/env python

      import random # Get a random number generator.

      NTRIALS = 10000 # Enough trials to get an reasonably accurate answer.

      NPEOPLE = 30 # How many people in the group?

      matches = 0 # Keep track of how many trials have matching birthdays.

      for trial in range(NTRIALS): 12# Do a bunch of trials...

      taken = {} # A place to keep track of which birthdays

      # are already taken on this trial.

      for person in range(NPEOPLE): 60# Put the people’s birthdays down, one at a time...

      day = random.randint(0, 365) # On a randomly chosen day.

      if day in taken:4

      matches += 1 # A match! # No need to look for more than one.

      taken[day] = 1 # Mark the day as taken.

      print("The fraction of trials that have matching birthdays is", float(matches)/NTRIALS)

    • CCSS Research Support has removed its installation of Stat Transfer software from our servers. Included below are instructions for converting data to different file formats without using Stat Transfer. Reasons for converting data to different formats include:

      • Export data to more user-friendly software for sending to fellow researchers.
      • Continue your research by further analyzing your data using a different programming language.

      Instructions

      Nearly all programming languages accept CSV data files. CSV stands for Comma Separated Values. CSV files can be opened and saved using excel as well as notepad for text. Making it a great file type for exporting and sharing. Below I include coding syntax, Example commands, Menu guidance and online documentation for exporting and importing CSV data for CCSS-RS most popular programs.

      Export Python Data to CSV

      Requires csv Python library. Syntax/Code Example
      Import csv
      with open('eggs.csv', 'w', newline='') as csvfile:
      spamwriter = csv.writer(csvfile, delimiter=' ',
      quotechar='|', quoting=csv.QUOTE_MINIMAL)
      spamwriter.writerow(['Spam'] * 5 + ['Baked Beans'])
      spamwriter.writerow(['Spam', 'Lovely Spam', 'Wonderful Spam'])
      Python can export to a variety of files other than CSV.
      Python Exporting CSV Documentation

      Import CSV Data into Python

      Pandas library helpful for importing and exporting csv files. Syntax/Code Example
      Import pandas and pd
      data = pd.read_csv("filename.csv")
      Import CSV into Python Documentation

  • R

    • Encountering errors attempting to knit your RMarkdown documents on CCSS servers? Check out the answers below to solve.

      Knit HTML & Word

      Error message received when I attempt to knit RMarkdown file to HTML or Word.

      pandoc.exe: \\: openBinaryFile: does not exist (No such file or directory)

      Error: pandoc document conversion failed with error 1

      Execution halted

      Example 1

      #SOLUTION: Copy and paste the normal colored font commands included below. Make sure to check that output from your commands resemble mine.

      #Check out library paths. I want to C: drive path to be listed first.

      library(rmarkdown)

      .libPaths()

      #[1] "\\\\rschfs1x/userRS/F-J/jrg363_rs/Documents/R/win-library/3.6"

      #[2] "C:/Program Files/R/R-3.6.1/library"

      #Switch order of paths using commands below.

      myPaths <- .libPaths() # get the paths

      myPaths <- c(myPaths[2], myPaths[1]) # switch them

      .libPaths(myPaths) # reassign them

      #View result of .libpaths(), results should be switched.

      .libPaths()

      #[1] “C:/Program Files/R/R-3.6.1/library”

      #[2] “\\\\rschfs1x/userRS/F-J/jrg363_rs/Documents/R/win-library/3.6”

       

      Example 2

      #Check out library paths. I want to C: drive path to be listed first.

      .libPaths()

      #[1] "\\\\rschfs1x/userts/jrg363_ts/Documents/.checkpoint/2019-12-14/lib/x86_64-w64-mingw32/4.0.1"

      #[2] "\\\\rschfs1x/userts/jrg363_ts/Documents/.checkpoint/R-4.0.1"

      #[3] "C:/PROGRA~1/R/R-40~1.1/library"

      mypaths <- .libPaths()

      #Take 3rd and 2nd paths in that order. ignore 1st.

      mypaths1 <- c(mypaths[3], mypaths[2])

      #Set Lib paths

      .libPaths(mypaths1)

      .libPaths()

      Now knit file to HTML or Word should work. If not please email CCSS-ResearchSupport@cornell.edu with questions.

      Information gotten from following URL

      Rstudio libraries

      Knit PDF

      Error message received when I attempt to knit to pdf.

      Sorry, but C:\PROGRA~1\MIKTEX~1.9\miktex\bin\x64\pdflatex.exe did not succeed.

      ! The log file hopefully contains the information to get MiKTeX going again:

      ! C:\Users\jrg363_rs\AppData\Local\MiKTeX\2.9\miktex\log\pdflatex.log

      Error: LaTeX failed to compile program.tex. See https://yihui.org/tinytex/r/#debugging for debugging tips. See program.log for more info.

      Execution halted

      #This process of setting up PDF took me an hour to load. You must do this process every time you open a new Rmarkdown session and would like to knit to pdf. Suggested idea to setup your RMarkdown to knit to pdf, then disconnect your session. Thus signing in to that same server will have you all set up. View URL below for how to disconnect.

      #Manage CCSS Sessions

      #SOLUTION: Copy and paste the normal colored font commands included below.

      install.packages('tinytex')

      #Users can not write to C: drive. If pop-up windows asks question included in screenshot below answer 'YES'RMarkdown Knit to HTML, Word & PDF

      #Command below takes the most time. Approx an hour to run to completion. Once this command is complete running user is allowed to knit to pdf.

      tinytex::install_tinytex()

      #While the above command runs expect to see the following windows pop-up. Errors suggest noting, they can be ignored. Answer 'OK' for all these windows.RMarkdown Knit to HTML, Word & PDF 2

      #Output of command used above too long to paste.

      #Use command below to test if above command worked. Expect result to be TRUE

      tinytex:::is_tinytex()

      #[1] TRUE

      You should be able to knit to pdf now.

      Any issues or questions please send email to CCSS-ResearchSupport@cornell.edu

      Information received from following URL

      knit to pdf

      Lastly, re-installing packages like ‘knitr’, ‘rmarkdown’ and ‘xfun’ may resolve the issue.

    • CCSS Research Support has removed its installation of Stat Transfer software from our servers. Included below are instructions for converting data to different file formats without using Stat Transfer. Reasons for converting data to different formats include:

      • Export data to more user-friendly software for sending to fellow researchers.
      • Continue your research by further analyzing your data using a different programming language.

      Instructions

      Nearly all programming languages accept CSV data files. CSV stands for Comma Separated Values. CSV files can be opened and saved using excel as well as notepad for text. Making it a great file type for exporting and sharing. Below I include coding syntax, Example commands, Menu guidance and online documentation for exporting and importing CSV data for CCSS-RS most popular programs.

      Export R data to CSV

      # Uses write.csv command. Syntax:
      write.csv(data_object, ‘filename.csv’)
      #Example Code

      df <- data.frame(name = c("Jon", "Bill", "Maria"), age = c(23, 41, 32))
      write.csv(df, 'U:/Downloads/file1.csv')
      R Exporting CSV Documentation
      R can export to a variety of formats. Some of the formats included in the following link.
      R Exporting to other File Formats

      Import csv data into R

      Uses read.csv command. Syntax:
      data_object = read.csv(‘filename.csv’)
      #Example code

      Df = read.csv('U:/Downloads/file1.csv')

    • Users of the CCSS Research Support servers may not write to the C drive of the servers, therefore you need to direct the installation of R packages onto your own work space. By default R packages you install will be located within Documents -> R -> win-library -> Rversion number

      To install and load R packages to your work space, a sample is shown below of installing the SemiPar package for your reference.

      First, using Windows Explorer create a sub-directory on your U drive to store your packages say, RPackages. In example below RPackages is inside my Documents folder.

      Then in R, type the following commands:

      install.packages(“SemiPar”, lib=”U:/Documents/RPackages”)

      library(SemiPar, lib=”U:/Documents/RPackages”)

      Note that in the install.packages command, SemiPar is enclosed in quotes, but not in the library command.

      You may need to tell R where to look for your installed packages. Do this by locating path to R files, copy it and paste it in following command .libPaths("path").

      #example: Using path from above example my packages are saved within U:/Documents/RPackages. I will set that as my library path like so.

      .libPaths("U:/Documents/RPackages")

    • You may need to install and load an R package that are provided from Github. Follow the instructions below to accomplish this.

      Example
      Sample package taken from following link https://github.com/jamesfeigenbaum/jjfPkg


      install.packages("remotes")
      library(remotes)
      install.packages("bitops")
      library(bitops)
      remotes::install_github("jamesfeigenbaum/jjfPkg", lib="U:\\Documents\\RPackages", force=TRUE)
      #At this point I will be asked to update packages. I select option 3. To update 'None' of the packages.
      library(jjfPkg, lib="U:\\Documents\\RPackages")

  • STATA

    • Q: How do I fill missing data using Stata?

      Data1 is how my data looks. Data2 is how I want to make it look.

      DATA1

      level1 level2 measure

      A . 12

      . 14

      . 45

      B . 12

      . 23

      . 34

      DATA2

      level1 level2 measure

      A 1 12

      A 2 14

      A 3 45

      B 1 12

      B 2 23

      B 3 34

       

      A: Here’s the Solution:

      clear

      input str1 level1 level2 measure

      A . 12

      "" . 14

      "" . 45

      B . 12

      "" . 23

      "" . 34

      end

      replace level1 = level1[_n-1] if level1 ==""

      bysort level1: replace level2 = _n

    • Q: Why can't I load my Stata dataset with an older version of Stata?

       

      A: Stata is backward compatible. Newer versions of Stata can read older versions but that is not the case for older Stata dealing with newer versions. Stata’s backwards compatibility works for 1 version away. Meaning Stata15 can read Stata14 data, Stata11 can read Stata10 data, Stata12 has same form as Stata11, but Stata15 can not read Stata11, because 15 and 11 are more than 1 version apart.

      There are 2 options to load newer Stata data sets into an older version of Stata.

      1. You can load the new Stata version data set into the old one with “use#”. Where # is the version of Stata that your data was created in.
        Example: My data is of version 13, but I want to load this data into version 10. Perform the command below
        use13 "my_dataset_path&name", clear
      2. You can save to older versions of Stata. Using the “saveold” command.
        Example: My data is of version 15, but I want to save the data so I can use it in Stata11. Perform the command below
        saveold data_name, version(11)

        Important: Stata15 can only save back to version 11. To save to an older version you must open data in Stata11 and use saveold again to go to an earlier version.
        Note: I included the “version(#)” option at the end of the “saveold” command. This will be talked about more later on in this FAQ.

       

      Q: Why are my older STATA commands not running like they used to?

      A: Stata is backwards compatible; however, command syntax for a previous version of Stata may not be identical to that of a newer version. You can use “version” to run Stata commands of a specific version. The version command was added for Stata14. Version command can be used in 3 ways.

      1. First, only typing “version” into command prompt will output current Stata version in use.
        Example:
        version *output will be version 16, Stata16 is most recent version on CCSS-RS servers.
        <strong=””>Note: An asterisk “*” in Stata and in this FAQ denote a comment, Stata does not interpret these. Comments are colored with green font</strong=””>

      To run a bunch of commands with earlier Stata syntax, use “version #”. Where # is the version of Stata you want following commands to be run under. The “version” command is treated as an umbrella term. Every command underneath the occurrence of “version #” will be run in compliance with Stata#, where # was specified in “version” command
      Example:
      version 11

      1. *{batch of commands I want to run using version 11}
        version 16 *When complete, return back to version I started with.

      Lastly, similar to the point above you can run single commands using an older version using version # : command. Where # is version number and “command” is the specific command you want to run for the specific version specified. This is useful when we are switching between multiple Stata versions for many different commands.Example:
      version 13:command *single command that I will run using Stata13
      version 15:command *single command that I will run using Stata15, likely as a result of previous command
      version 11:command *single command that I will run using Stata11, likely as a result of previous 2 commands

    • Q:   I get the following error when trying to read a particular dataset from the CISER Data & Reproduction Archive.  What is the problem?

      file da6847.raw not found

      r(601);

      A:   As a shortcut, many Stata commands (such as use, save, insheet, outsheet, infile, outfile and infix) add a default extension.

      For example, if you type:

      infix var1 1-6 var2 7-9 using filename

      then Stata will assume that you are referring to filename.raw.

      Many ASCII(text) files in the CISER Data & Reproduction Archive have no file extension at all. To prevent Stata from adding the default file extension to these, simply add a period to the end of the file name.

      For example, if you wish to read the first two variables from the 1993 Natality Detail File, use:

      infix year 1-4 rectype 5 using da6847.

      If you omit the period, Stata will look in vain for da6847.raw and return the error message above.

    • Installing user written ado files on the research servers

      NOTE:  CCSS Research Support requires that each individual researcher follow the instructions below for installing ado files.

      Q1:  When I try to download and install user written programs I get an “access denied” message. How can I use these?

      Q2:  I am running Stata on a research server and I’m interested in using some commands that are not part of the main software. These commands are written by users and available to be installed into Stata through the web. The Stata reference manual makes this sound straightforward, but when I go through the steps on a research server, I can’t install the new command because I don’t have permission to add files to the space where the Stata code is kept on the server. How do I get around this?

       

      ANSWER:

      It’s true that research server users do not have permissions to write to the default path for STB and other user-written files. However users can still install these files to their U drive. Sample code for installing “reghdfe” package provided under “Example” section.

      First, from within Stata you can issue the command “sysdir” to see the list of the system set directories, to which Stata points to by default.  Included in the list of default settings are these entries:

      PLUS: C:\ado\plus

      PERSONAL: C:\ado\personal

      The PLUS folder is the destination for downloaded ado files written by other users.  The PERSONAL folder is intended for ado files you have written.  CCSS-RS computing account users do not have permission to write to the C:\ drive so there are other options:  If you need to use an ado file you can install

      it yourself by redirecting the PLUS folder to your U drive (as shown below).   To install user written ado files (anytime) you’ll need to use  the “sysdir set” commands (case is important) to redirect the PERSONAL or PLUS folders as shown below:

       

      sysdir set PLUS "U:\folder"

      sysdir set PERSONAL "U:\folder"

       

      where “folder” is the subfolder you wish to save your ado files in (you must create this first). This location used in “sysdir set” command must be the same as your current working directory location and the same location as where all the files you are working on.

       

      Example

      You may copy and paste most of the commands below. Know that for this example I have a folder in my documents named “Statafiles”

       

      sysdir set PLUS "U:\Documents\Statafiles"

      sysdir set PERSONAL "U:\Documents\Statafiles"

      *Green text is a comment. Set directory to same location set for PLUS directory. This is also the place where all your Stata working files are saved.

      cd "U:\Documents\Statafiles"

      *Use option below if you know the name of the ado file you wish to use

      ssc install reghdfe

      *May need to use option below if you do not know exact name of ado file. Search features/commands of ado you want

      search reghdfe

      *After search command above, a new window will pop-up with options to download packages that fit search criteria.

      *Click on the package name you would like to install. You will be directed to another page. Scroll down to the section "Installation Files", select "(click here to install)". Package will be installed to location you set as PLUS or PERSONAL directory

      ***********************************************

      To make this a “permanent” change do this:

      Create a shortcut to the Stata application on your desktop (Start → All Programs → right-click on Stata17 → More → Open File Location → Right-click on StataMP 17(64-bit) → “send to” → Desktop(create shortcut)).  Then find the newly created shortcut on your desktop, right click on the icon and choose “properties” → “Shortcut” tab.  In the “Start In” field enter the path “U:\Documents”. In “Target” field enter “C:\Program Files\Stata17\StataMP-64.exe” only. If you see other text in this field delete it, you may see “/UseRegistryStartin” within the Target field, delete that.  Use the Stata do file editor to create a file called “profile.do” file which contains the sysdir commands you wish to use.  Be sure to place the profile.do file in the directory “U:\Documents”.  Stata will automatically look for the profile.do file when opening and run those commands.

    • Sometimes the default Stata temp space run out of storage. You may have to redirect the location of your temp file to fix this. Here’s what you should do.

      While signed into the servers begin inside the Notepad application. Open start menu by clicking windows icon in bottom left, type “notepad” and select Notepad desktop application.

      Open Notepad.

      Paste the following into your Notepad application. A full example of this will be printed near the bottom of the page.:

       

      set STATATMP=U:\statatemp

      cd u:\project

      "C:\Program Files\Stata17\StataMP-64.exe"

      Save the notepad file with a .bat extension to create a batch file (e.g., Statatemp.bat). Do not save it with the default .txt extension. It has to have a .bat extension.

      The quotes when pasted from this FAQ to notepad do not come out as standard quotes.  Delete and replace the quotation marks after you have pasted the above commands into notepad. If the text inside the quotes are color coded; delete the quotes and re-enter them in the same position.

      Make sure to put an empty line after the 3rd line of code. A total of 4 lines in your Notepad. 3 commands and 1 empty line at the end.

      Make sure you create a folder named “statatemp” inside your U drive.  U:\statatemp folder mentioned on the set command above. You can specify any path\folder here provided they exist. This is where Stata will redirect your temp files.

      Replace the u:\project folder with your own project path\folder.

      Do not change the last line. The point of the last line is to run the .exe file that would open stata. If you are using a different Stata version the path\folder and .exe name may be different. 

      Once created, double-click on the .bat file.

      From hereon double click on the .bat file created using the above specifications. Double clicking the file should open Stata automatically, if it does not there is an issue with the .bat file created. You can run the commands below to check where your tempfile is going:

      tempfile junk

      display “`junk'”

      It should show the temp file being stored in the folder you specified on the set command.

      Example

      Example using my research account.

       

      set STATATMP=U:\Desktop\statatemp

      cd U:\Documents\stata_test

      "C:\Program Files\Stata17\StataMP-64.exe"

      Contact the CCSS-RS HelpDesk with any questions or issues.

  • SAS

    • How do I convert a SAS .trn or .stc file into a different format like Stata, SPSS, Excel, ect. ?

      Answer: There are 2 answers to this FAQ. Please try the first Answer. If it does not work attempt the second answer. If neither work contact the CCSS-RS HelpDesk.

      You may copy and paste most of the sample codes below. The quotation marks do not paste correctly from this FAQ into SAS editor. You must delete and re-enter the quotation marks. SAS codes are color coded, text inside quotation marks should be purple. Green text are comments

      Begin by saving the .trn to a folder on your U drive while connected to the CCSS-RS servers. Remember where you save your .trn file on the servers, we will be using it later.

      In SAS Editor enter the following commands, replace “PATH” and filenames your personal path locations and file names:

      ANSWER 1

      *GREEN TEXT DENOTES A COMMENT, intended for you to read.;

      *Purpose: Dataset is of .trn format. Must import .trn file into a SAS dataset first. Once a SAS dataset has been created we can convert it into any other format like excel, SPSS, Stata, ect to run statistics on data;

      *Begin by setting SAS library. Library is exact path location of where .trn file is saved;

      *LIBNAME ALIAS "PATH";

      LIBNAME JG "U:\Documents”;

      *Above example JG is my “ALIAS” AND “U:\Documents” is my “PATH” where .trn file is saved;

      *Data step below to convert .trn file into SAS dataset;

      *DATA alias.newSASdatasetname;

      DATA JG.EEOP1;

      *ALIAS JG used above to save SAS dataset “EEOP1” to PATH “U:\Documents”

      *Reference .trn file and convert to SAS dataset;

      *FILENAME TRANS "FULLPATH\FILE.TRN";

      FILENAME TRANS "U:\Documents\ui.trn";

      RUN;

       

      *PROC CIMPORT INFILE=TRANS LIB=ALIAS;

      PROC CIMPORT INFILE=TRANS LIB=JG;

      RUN;

      *At this point, a new SAS dataset named EEOP1 should be saved to location “U:\Documents”;

      *Make sure to check the SAS log for notes and errors;

      *Directly below is example using GSS data from ICPSR GSS ICPSR. Easier for copying and pasting into SAS editor;

      Example Code 1

       

      LIBNAME JG "U:\Documents\GSS ICPSR\ICPSR_36319\DS0001";

      DATA JG.GSS;

      FILENAME TRANS "U:\Documents\GSS ICPSR\ICPSR_36319\DS0001\36319-0001-Data.stc";

      RUN;

      PROC CIMPORT INFILE=TRANS LIB=JG;

      RUN;

       

      * Resulting data set saved with name 'DA36319P1'. Apply accompanying formats with GSS data;

      OPTIONS FMTSEARCH=(JG.formats);

      * SAS DATA STEP. KEEP A FEW VARIABLES FOR FASTER PROCESSING;

      DATA JG.GSSt1(keep=YEAR ID HRS1);

      SET JG.DA36319P1(obs=50);

      RUN;

       

      *From here, use the Stat Transfer application to convert SAS dataset into Stata, Excel, SPSS, anything;

      *If above suggestion is not successful, try Answer 2 below;

      ANSWER 2

      The code below relates to the data found at the following link. hegis data sample. If you attempt to convert this data set using Answer 1 an error will occur. Thus attempt the solution below.

      *Below reference full path along with file;

      *LIBNAME TRANS XPORT "PATH\TRN_FILE_NAME";

      LIBNAME TRANS XPORT “U:\Documents\user files\jrg363\heg.erd8485.ed184.trn”;

      *Below specifies path location of where SAS dataset from .trn file will be saved;

      *LIBNAME NEW “PATH”;

      LIBNAME NEW “U:\Documents\user files\jrg363”;

      RUN;

      *Below creates SAS dataset;

      PROC COPY IN = TRANS OUT = NEW;

      RUN;

      *Lastly export SAS dataset to specific file type, below creates stata dataset because ‘.dta’ extension;

      PROC EXPORT DATA = NEW.ED184 OUTFILE = "U:\Documents\user files\jrg363\jrg363ts.dta";

      RUN;

      *Below creates SPSS dataset because ‘.sav’ extension;

      PROC EXPORT DATA = NEW.ED184 OUTFILE = "U:\Documents\user files\jrg363\jrg363ts.sav";

      RUN;

      *Below creates .csv dataset because ‘.csv’ extension;

      PROC EXPORT DATA = NEW.ED184 OUTFILE = "U:\Documents\user files\jrg363\jrg363ts.csv";

      RUN;

      *Below full Example of importing .trn and exporting to Stata format.

      Example Code 2

      LIBNAME TRANS XPORT “U:\Documents\user files\jrg363\heg.erd8485.ed184.trn”;

      LIBNAME NEW “U:\Documents\user files\jrg363”;

      RUN;

      PROC COPY IN = TRANS OUT = NEW;

      RUN;

      PROC EXPORT DATA = NEW.ED184 OUTFILE = "U:\Documents\user files\jrg363\jrg363ts.dta";

       

      Alternative ways to converting the SAS data set into another form is to:

      • Read the newly created SAS data set with another software. Example: The STATA command for reading in a SAS dataset is as follows:
        usesas using “path\file_name”
    • Working with dates where years are in two-digit formats 

      Q.  Dates in my data have only two digits to represent a year. The digits 00 represent the year 2000, but my SAS program interprets this as 1900. What can I do about this?

      A.  Use the SAS system option “YEARCUTOFF=” to specify the first year of a 100 year span within which you want your 2-digit dates to fall.   For example:

      options yearcutoff=1950;

      would interpret the 2-digit year values 50-99 as 1950 to 1999 and values 00-49 as being 2000 to 2049.

      For SAS Versions 6.04 –  6.12 the system default value is YEARCUTOFF= 1900.  This means that all two digit years will be assumed to be between 1900 and 1999, unless you reset the default.

      For SAS Version 7.0 — 8.1  the system default is YEARCUTOFF=1920.  This means that all two digit years will be assumed to be between 1920 and 2019, unless you reset the default.

      The default value for either version can be easily reset by using the “YEARCUTOFF=” option as shown above.

      To find out whether the YEARCUTOFF option has been reset on any version of SAS that you are using you can submit these statements:

      proc options option=yearcutoff;
      run;

      OR — from SAS 8.1 for Windows just go to Tools –> Options –> System –> Input Control –> Data Processing.  Then scroll down through the list of options until you see Yearcutoff...

    • How do I create a SAS data set with compressed obersations? 

      To create a compressed SAS data set, use the COMPRESS=YES option as an output DATA set option or in an OPTIONS statement. Compressing a data set reduces its size by reducing repeated consecutive characters or numbers to 2-byte or 3-byte representations. To uncompress observations, you must use a DATA step to copy the data set and use option COMPRESS=NO for the new data set.

      The advantages of using a SAS compressed data set are reduced storage requirements for the data set and fewer input/output operations necessary to read from and write to the data set during processing. The disadvantages include not being able to use SAS observation number to access an observation. The CPU time required to prepare compressed observations for input/output observations is increased because of the overhead of compressing and expanding the observations. (Note: If there are few repeated characters, a data set can occupy more space in compressed form than in uncompressed form, due to the higher overhead per observation.) For more details on SAS compression see “SAS Language: Reference, Version 6, First Edition, Cary, NC: SAS Institute Inc., 1990”.

      The two ways to compress data sets in SAS:

      • Using the option in the DATA step to compress a data set:
        • data ssd.income (compress=yes);
      • To compress all data sets created within SAS sessions
        • options compress=yes;
  • SPSS

    • That’s because SPSS is trying to direct its temporary work files (“.temp” files that the user never sees) to a location for which you don’t have write access. Here’s what you do to fix that:

      From within SPSS:

      • Go to Edit -> Options -> and select the “File Locations” tab.

      Type in “U:\Desktop” in the “Temporary folder” box and press the “OK” button. Click “Browse” button to select a different location.

      • Answer “yes” if you get the message: “Directory does not exist. Create a new one?“
      • This will direct your files to your Desktop.
      • Then proceed with your SPSS work. You should be able to create graphs with no problem.
  • Other

    • Researchers can download and install Excel add-ins while connected to the servers.

      Instructions Included with Example of downloading and installing Excel add-in “Open Solver”

      • Connect to CCSS-RS computing server.
        Login Instructions
      • Open web browser(Internet Explorer, Firefox or Microsoft Edge) and go to URL in which you can download Excel add-in
        Open Solver Link below.
        Open Solver Download Link
      • Download and save all the associated files on the U drive(Downloads, Documents, Desktop). More information about CCSS-RS server’s U drive found in the following link.
        CCSS Work Environment If necessary unzip the files
      • You only need to perform previous steps once. Recall where you downloaded the files. Following steps may need to be performed every time you want to use Open Solver.
      • Open Excel
      • Open blank page
      • Select File -> Options -> Add-ins
      • At bottom in “manage” makes sure “Excel add-ins” is select then press Go

      Excel Add in Instructions

      • Click on Browse – search folders to where you downloaded and saved the Add-in files in the earlier steps
      • Select the .xlam file. For OpenSolver the file is named “OpenSolver.xlam”
      • Close out Add-in box
      • Open Solver add-in will be visible within the “Data” tab of excel.

      Any questions message CCSS-ResearchSupport@cornell.edu

       

    • NVivo projects on the CCSS Research Support servers can sometimes not save correctly. As a result you could unknowingly lose hours of hard work. Avoid this frustration by frequently Copying your project file. Steps are as follows.

      • Once you have finished working for the day copy your project file.
      • “File” -> “Copy Project”
      • Assign a name to your project file. By default a date and time is attached. It is suggested to keep that information so you know which project file is most recent.
      • Save copied project file somewhere on your U: drive. Can open at any time.

      When you open the software NVivo it brings up the most recently worked on and saved projects. Sometimes the recently worked on projects do not appear in the list correctly. This is when a copying project file would be beneficial. If the save does not work correctly you can always open the copied file.

      Instructions for copying project from NVivo website included below.

      NVivo Copy Project

      Restoring Backups

      NVivo on CCSS-RS automatically backs up your projects once a week and stores them as .nvb files in the following location:

      U:\Documents\NVivo 12 Recovery

      To recover project perform following steps

      1. Sign in to CCSS-RS servers
      2. Open File Explorer and navigate to following folder location: U:\Documents\NVivo 12 Recovery

      Locate and send .nvb file to NVivo support by filling out form in following link: Technical Support Form Ask them to recover project and send back as .nvp file.

    • Difficulty loading and using the Spatial Analyst toolbox? Perform the following steps.

      1. Open Python
      2. type the following into Python

        import arcgisscripting
        gp = arcgisscripting.create()
        gp.CheckOutExtension("Spatial")
         
      3. Open ArcGIS
      4. Geoprocessing ->ArcToolbox -> Spatial Analyst Tools
Research Support Computing Account User Guide


User Guide

  • We'd love to hear your ideas, suggestions, or questions!

    Are you
    CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
    5 + 5 =
    Solve this simple math problem and enter the result. E.g. for 1+3, enter 4.