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2021 CCSS Grant Writing Development Program

This exciting NIH Grant Development Program will feature three components: a four-part workshop series, pilot grants, and a grant development fellowship.

  • Workshop Series

    • NIH Grant Development Workshop Series

      CCSS, in partnership with Cornell Center for Health Equity (CCHEq) and The Cornell Population Center (CPC), is hosting four, hour-long workshops open to all Cornell faculty, postdocs, graduate students, and researchers oriented toward learning about the NIH grants process and developing strategies for crafting a competitive proposal.

      Upcoming Workshops:

      1. March 10th, 12-1 pm - Writing NIH Specific Aims for Social and Behavioral Sciences

      2. March 23rd, 11 am-12 pm or April 2nd, 12-1pm - The Grant Review Process at NIH

    • Writing NIH Specific Aims for Social and Behavioral Sciences

      March 10, 2021
      12 – 1 pm

      This session will cover four general topics: 

      • Specific aims for social and behavioral science research
      • Process for drafting specific aims, and getting feedback
      • Engaging community partners and collaborators
      • Other tips for writing successful specific aims

      This is the third session of a 4-part workshop series focused on tips, strategies and resources for social science research at NIH.

      Presented by Erica Phillips and Seth Sanders

      Erica Phillips, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell

      Seth Sanders, Ronald G. Ehrenberg Chair of Labor Economics, Cornell University

      Register and attend:

      Zoom Link

      For questions pertaining to this workshop, please email Irina Bovt.

    • The Grant Review Process at NIH

      This is the fourth and final session of a 4-part workshop series focused on tips, strategies and resources for social science research at NIH. Participants may attend either workshop:

      March 23, 2021
      11 am – 12 pm

      Presented by Kelly Blake, Program Director at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

      April 2, 2021
      12 – 1 pm

      Presented by Rebecca Clark, Chief of Population Dynamics Branch at the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

      Zoom links to be announced.

      For questions pertaining to the final workshop in this series, please email Irina Bovt.

    • NIH 101: Getting Grants in the Social Sciences at Cornell, Feb. 10, 2021

       This workshop was planned to:

      • Provide an overview of NIH opportunities and grant mechanisms
      • Enable attendees to use NIH tools to find funding opportunities and program officers
      • Describe support and resources available to Cornell researchers for NIH grant preparation

      Presented by Carmel Lee, Director of Research Development in Cornell’s Office of Sponsored Programs

      Carmel Lee is the Director of Research Development at Cornell University where she supports the development of large, interdisciplinary center grants as well as strategic, investigator-initiated grants. She develops and runs early career faculty programs; conducts grant-writing workshops; runs the Concierge program for new faculty; and manages the limited submissions process. She has more than 20 years of experience in proposal and research development in academia and industry. She has a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology, an MBA, and started the PhD program in Sociology at Cornell last fall.

      Strategic Planning for NIH Grant Submissions, Feb. 24, 2021

      This session addressed four key points related to NIH grant planning:

      • What makes for a good NIH grant idea? 
      • What are the pros and cons of various NIH mechanisms?
      • When and how to build interdisciplinary research teams
      • Time management skills for completing grant components

      Presented by Parfait M. Eloundou-Enyegue & Martin Shapiro

      Parfait M. Eloundou-Enyegue, Professor, Global Development

      Martin Shapiro, Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell

       

      Contact Irina Bovt if you would like access to any of the workshop recordings.

  • Program Overview

    The 2021 CCSS Grant Writing Development Program will focus on mentoring social science faculty through the process of writing an NIH grant from concept to submission.

    We are excited to sponsor the program in collaboration with Cornell Center for Health Equity (CCHEq) and The Cornell Population Center (CPC).   

    Cornell researchers across colleges and departments have a long record of securing NIH funding, and NIH offers RFPs that fit with many areas of social science including (but not limited to) psychology, sociology, communication, human development, policy, government, demography, and economics. NIH topics of interest extend broadly into the social sciences and include social determinants of health and well-being such as (but not limited to) incarceration, racial discrimination and social justice, along with population science on topics such as climate migration, aging, and mortality differentials.

    Program Goals:

    1. Incentivize and support high-quality NIH (K, R01 or R21) grant submissions from social science faculty across Cornell’s campuses

    2. Directly respond to requests from junior faculty members of several Cornell centers for greater institutional support for their health-related research

    3. Build inter-campus collaborations by leveraging NIH expertise at Weill Cornell Medical College and social science expertise across Cornell’s campuses but particularly in Ithaca.

    Program Structure:

    This program is open to PI-eligible social scientists across Cornell University. 

    The program will consist of a workshop series of 4 hour-long sessions (from February and through early April) in which participants selected for the 2021 NIH Grant Writing Cohort will work toward developing a well-considered Specific Aims page. Faculty selected for the cohort will be expected to attend all four workshops in the series. The cohort will attend/view each workshop, complete short “homework” assignments for each session, and draft a Specific Aims page. From there, they will be eligible to apply for one of two funding tracks in late spring and summer.

    Track One: Pilot Grant Program

    This track is for those eligible faculty from the cohort who do not yet have preliminary data and are on a grant submission timeline that is after February 2022.

    Track Two: Grant Development Fellowship Program

    A larger amount of resources to support grant writing + additional resources to support efforts from a mentor. Those on this track will be expected to submit an R01, R21 or K application within the next 12 months. 

    Applications for the 2021 NIH Grant Writing Cohort are closed.   

    The workshop series is open to all faculty, postdocs, graduate students, and researchers oriented toward learning about the NIH grants process and developing strategies for crafting a competitive proposal. Please contact Irina Bovt with questions.

  • 2021 NIH Grant Writing Cohort

     

     

    • After the cohort attends each workshop in the series and completes short “homework” assignments for each session, they will draft and submit a Specific Aims page.

      By April 15th - Cohort members will submit a Specific Aims page for review.

      By May 15th - Cohort members who submitted their Specific Aims page receive a score (an average from the reviewers) and comments from 2-3 reviewers.

      By May 31st - Cohort members submit their revised Specific Aims page and additional materials for consideration for one of the two subsequent tracks.

    • Track One: Pilot Grant Program

      This track is for those eligible faculty from the cohort who do not yet have preliminary data and are on a grant submission timeline that is after February 2022.

      Upon completion of the workshop series, cohort members submit a revised Specific Aims page, a one-page “response to reviewers,” a description of what preliminary data would be needed to enhance the competitiveness of the proposal by May 31st, and a brief budget; decisions rendered by June 15th. Successful proposals may receive up to $8,000 for data collection or other research-related costs associated with enhancing the project. Funds may not be used for hardware purchasing or faculty salary.

      Proposals will be evaluated by a review panel and program leadership. Proposals will be scored based on (a) likelihood of success (using scores from the specific aims review and proposed revisions) and (b) center priorities.

      Track Two: Grant Development Fellowship Program

      This track is for cohort members who have identified a grant submission timeline that is on or before February 2022 (typical NIH timeline would be October and February).

      Upon completion of the workshop series, cohort members submit (a) a revised Specific Aims page and a brief, one-page response to reviews from the original submission, (b) PI and team (including a mentor who has agreed to the role), (c) a targeted mechanism and rationale for why the proposal is a good fit for that mechanism/call, (d) timeline for submission of proposal, and (e) budget for proposal.

      Proposals will be evaluated by a review panel and program leadership. Proposals will be scored based on (a) likelihood of success (using scores from the specific aims review and proposed revisions) and (b) center priorities.

      Mentors will be selected by the PIs. Participating centers can provide assistance in helping their members identify relevant mentors. The mentor’s job is to (a) engage additional experts as needed to make the project competitive; (b) read and edit drafts of the proposal; and (c) assist with identifying institutional resources to support the proposal.

      Proposed funds available for investigator: successful proposals will receive up to $15,000 for up to 1-month of summer salary to use on grant preparation (RA, pilot data, or travel for proposal planning at researcher’s discretion). Please note that summary salary will need to be disclosed on a PI’s current and pending when submitting a proposal to NIH.

      Proposed funds available for mentor: successful proposals will receive up to $3,000 for a commitment to mentor applicant through the grant submission process. The mentor may or may not serve as a co-PI.

      Fellows are expected to submit a grant proposal to NIH by February 2022 (a one-grant cycle extension is permitted – from October 2021 proposed to February 2022, for example). Upon submission, fellows receive an additional $2,000 in a discretionary or research account.

      Timeline for NIH Grant Development Fellowship Track

      1. By June 15th – decisions are made on successful applicants, money distributed.

      2. June – each cohort member is paired with a grants support specialist.

      3. July/August – cohort member prepares Approach section of the grant.

      4. August/September – mock study section for grants with October deadline.

      5. November/December – mock study section for grants with February deadline.

      6. Spring/Summer 2022 – teams who submit and receive competitive scores, but are not funded, have option to apply to CCSS for additional grant development funds in pursuit of resubmission.

      Cohort members who are eligible and complete this process, including specific aims - and are not selected to move into one of the two tracks - can apply to receive up to $3,000 in discretionary funds to pursue their research to pilot a new idea. To receive the funds, applicants must submit a brief budget with a business purpose.

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