Spring 2010 Awards

Cohort Highlight: ISS Awards Grants to Cornell Researchers

Expertise Recognition in Cross-Cultural Collaboration: The Impact of Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Communication
Natalya Bazarova, Communication
Connie Yuan, Communication
Funded with generous support by the President’s Council of Cornell Women

Preventing Deviant Internet Behavior: An Application of Prospect Theory
Sahara Byrne, Communication
Sunny “Sun Jung” Kim, Communication

Leveraging the ASHEcon Conference at Cornell to Promote Exchange Across the Social Sciences
John Cawley, Policy Analysis and Management

Overseas Charity in Early Modern Europe: Empathy, Obligation, and Global Networks
Duane Corpis, History

Design Tactics and the Informalized City

Jeremy Foster, Landscape Architecture
Lily Chi, Architecture
Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning
Caroline O’Donnell, Architecture

The Duality of Telecom Policymaking: The Case of Internet Governance Debates

Tarleton Gillespie, Communication
Dimitry Epstein, Communication

An Exploration of the Effect of Design Interventions on Reducing Sedentary Behavior in Workplace

Ying Hua, Design & Environmental Analysis
Funded with generous support by the President’s Council of Cornell Women

Exploring Trans-disciplinary Research in Environmental Education and Related Fields
Marianne Krasny, Natural Resources
Janis Dickinson, Natural Resources
Justin Dillon, London

Engaging Images: Artists and the Art of Life in 20th Century South Africa
Daniel Magaziner, History

Rethinking Development in an Age of Climate Change
Fouad Makki, Development Sociology
Shelley Feldman
, Development Sociology
Charles Geisler, Development Sociology
Phil McMichael, Development Sociology

Linguistic and Emotional Factors in Intergroup Linguistic Bias
Poppy McLeod, Communication

Kin and Kingdom: Using GIS to Understand the Relationship Between Tribes and Elections in Jordan
David Patel, Government

Fluid Empires: Water Management Across the French Mediterranean

Sara Pritchard, Science & Technology Studies
Co-sponsored with generous support by the Einaudi Center 

Estimating the Impact of Alternative Canopy Management Practices on White Wine Purchase Decisions 
Todd Schmit, Applied Economics and Management
Bradley Rickard, Applied Economics and Management
Anna Mansfield, Food Science

Eating Network Partners
Jeffrey Sobal, Nutritional Science
Matthew Brashears, Sociology
Karla Hanson, Nutritional Science

The Causal Mechanisms of the Democratic Peace

Jessica Weeks, Government
Michael Tomz, Stanford University

Expertise Recognition in Cross-Cultural CollaborationThe Impact of Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Communication
Natalya Bazarova, Communication and Connie Yuan, Communication

The goal of this research is to investigate the interplay of cultural factors and communication technology on expertise recognition in cross-cultural collaboration. Although a team’s success depends to a large extent on how well members recognize and integrate one another’s knowledge and skills, expertise recognition is a major challenge in teamwork. This challenge can be further intensified in cross-cultural collaboration because of cognitive and behavioral differences, such as stereotypical perceptions of expertise and communication styles, between cultures. These differences may become less or more prominent depending on the type of communication technology used for collaboration. Building on preliminary interviews conducted for this research, the first study tests predictions about the interaction of culture and technology on expertise recognition in cross-cultural groups. Future studies will examine cross cultural teams with members located in different countries, with an ultimate goal of developing successful interventions to improve expertise evaluation in international collaboration.

Update: As of 2011, Profs. Bazarova and Yuan’s project goal was to examine the interplay of culture and communication technology on members’ communication styles, and expert recognition and influence in intercultural groups. The results of their laboratory experiment using Chinese and American participants demonstrated that the effect of experts’ ethnicity was moderated by communication technology. Despite having similar levels of task expertise, in face-to-face groups Chinese members participated less, were perceived as less confident, and had their expertise underestimated compared to American members. In computer-mediated text communication Chinese and American experts showed more similar communication styles, which led to reduced differences in expertise recognition and influence of Chinese experts compared to American experts. The results of this study are coming out in the following publication: Bazarova, N.N., & Yuan, C.Y. (forthcoming). Expertise recognition and influence in intercultural groups: Differences between face-to-face and computer-mediated communication. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communicaiton. For press coverage of Prof. Bazarova’s research, see Spring 2010 ISS’ Small Grant Awardee, Natalie Bazarova, Studies Airing of Personal Matters Over Facebook (2014) and Natalie Bazarova comments on the effects of pro-anorexia sites (2014).

Preventing Deviant Internet Behavior: An Application of Prospect Theory
Sahara Byrne, Communication and Sunny “Sun Jung” Kim, Communication

Just as organizations embraced the Internet as a primary method of task-related communication, a social phenomenon was born – employees using Internet access for non-work related purposes, i.e., cyberloafing. Cyberloafing refers to deviant behaviors that describe employees use of their companies’ Internet access for personal reasons during work hours, and it is often perceived as aimless and dysfunctional work behavior. Despite continuous attempts to intervene with organizational policy and technical systems to prevent employees from engaging in cyberloafing from the top-down perspective, there is a lack of empirical research on how to change beliefs, attitude, and behaviors of Internet users through communicative approaches, i.e., campaigns. Based upon theories from communication, psychology, and behavioral science, this project aims to test cyberloafing prevention campaigns by varying conceptual components from message framing and prospect theory. Theoretical foundations, research designs, and future research directions are discussed.

Update: As of 2011, this research resulted in an article titled, “Conceptualizing personal web usage in work contexts: A preliminary framework,” published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior. Other press coverage includes, “Sahara Byrne, ISS’ Small Grant PI (Spring 2010), Finds Parents Could be Clueless about Risky Online Behavior” (2013)and ISS Small Grant Award Winners Byrne and Niederdeppe Receive $3M Grant to Study Tobacco Warnings (2014).

Leveraging the ASHEcon Conference at Cornell to Promote Exchange Across the Social Sciences
John Cawley, Policy Analysis and Management

The third biennial conference of the American Society of Health Economists (ASHEcon) will be hosted by Cornell University June 20-23, 2010. ASHEcon is the professional organization of U.S. health economists and its biennial conference is the premiere health economics research conference in the U.S. The goal of this proposal is to take advantage of the conference’s presence on campus to facilitate exchange of perspectives, methods, and findings across the social sciences. This will be accomplished by subsidizing the conference registration of social scientists (other than economists) at Cornell, subsidizing the conference registration of graduate students at Cornell, and sponsoring three paper sessions at which multiple social science disciplines will present their perspectives and findings on a similar research topic (e.g. elderly decision-making as concerns health, peer effects in risky behaviors).

Update: The ASHEcon conference was a fantastic success.   As the Executive Director Dick Arnould wrote in the Fall 2010 ASHEcon newsletter: “There was record of almost 750 people in attendance; there were over 500 oral presentations and 115 poster presentations. Of those responding to the online survey, over 93% gave the conference a rating of 4 or 5, where 5 is the highest score. The quality of papers received very high ratings. Equally important is the fact that in no area was there a low rating.” By hosting the conference at Cornell, the profile of social science at Cornell was raised within the nationwide community of health economists and at the same time more social scientists at Cornell were able to hear about the first-rate research being done in health economics nationwide. Press coverage includes, ISS’ Spring 2005 and Spring 2010 Small Grant Awardee, John Cawley, to Study Obesity Economics with National Award.

Overseas Charity in Early Modern Europe: Empathy, Obligation, and Global Networks
Duane Corpis, History

Current scholarly commentary on global charity recognizes the roles that power, interest, and ideology play in wealthy nations’ humanitarian projects of foreign aid, whether private or state-run initiatives. However, this scholarship typically lacks historical depth. What were the aims, goals, and consequences of European overseas charity at a time before the modern nation-state, when European commercial capitalism was just beginning to consolidate? My project aims to provide a historical account of the emergence of overseas networks of European charity in the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. The first stage of my research this summer entails visiting the German city of Halle, the center of German Pietism in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The archives located here include extensive materials on the Pietists’ wide-ranging global activities, especially their missionary work in North America, Eastern Europe, and India. Charitable funds gathered from Pietist congregations throughout Germany followed the missionaries in order to build new schools and churches, provide Bibles to new converts, and supply clothing and shelter for overseas communities. My research aims to answer several questions. Who were the various agents that maintained the material and social networks along which European overseas charity moved? How did a European humanitarian ethic develop to accommodate the growing awareness and recognition of non-European societies, while also restructuring the global hierarchies distinguishing Europe from the rest of the world? How did expanded European interaction with the world transform charitable empathy from a face-to-face experience within the immediate local community to one that extended into a largely imaginary global space? What types of obligation did early-modern overseas charity demand of recipients, and what were the cultural, social, and political expectations and tensions such reciprocity generated?

Update: In 2010, Professor Corpis spent 2 months in Leipzig, Halle, and Dresden, three cities in Germany that were centers of eighteenth-century Lutheran Pietism. While researching in the church and city archives of Leipzig, Halle, and Dresden,  he discovered a massive collection of documents relevant to his  research project. The best collections were housed in Halle at the Frankesche Foundation Archives.  There, he knew he would find correspondence between Protestant missionaries and by the church and civic institutions in Halle, including documents concerning charitable funds used to support missions in India and North America.  He found account books and receipt books that will help him reconstruct the transfers of moneys and gifts from German Protestant coffers to overseas missions.  What he did not expect to find was a body of documents dealing with the Pietists’ work on ransoming Protestant prisoners of war taken in both Russian and Ottoman territories.  He had originally assumed that ransoming POWs was largely a Catholic endeavor, but apparently rescuing Protestants in non-Protestant lands in order to keep them from converting seemed as desperate a goal as converting non-Christians in foreign territories. This initial research will form the basis of a very large-scale book project, including English and possibly Dutch archival sources.

Design Tactics and the Informalized City
Jeremy Foster, Landscape Architecture, Lily Chi, Architecture, Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning, and Caroline O’Donnell, Architecture

The “informal” has emerged in a number of fields as an important theme of study. For many theorists, the informal is no longer a discrete sector of urban, social, and economic activity appended to the workings of the “formal” city, but an integral effect of the restructuring of cities and landscapes by contemporary economic, political and technological developments. Self-built architectures, ambivalent landscapes, nomadic and temporal spatial formations… the manifestations of the city “informalized” are situationally specific, but globally ubiquitous. The conference for which we seek support expands upon existing research by bringing the discussion of the informal to disciplines that act on the city in material and spatial terms: architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, civil engineering, media and product design… Charged with shaping and managing living environments, usually on behalf of instituted powers and resources, many of these practices broach intriguing disciplinary limits in confronting the informalized city: from the medium and matter of design, to representational tactics and premises, to questions of agency, constituency, and purpose. “Building on the Informalized City” identifies a number of these interstices for discussion by scholars and practitioners from diverse research and design fields. Through this venue, we hope to contribute a mapping of spatial modalities of the informal, as well as critical terms and tactics for ethical and creative engagement.

Update: This conference was held in April 2012.

The Duality of Telecom Policymaking: The Case of Internet Governance Debates
Tarleton Gillespie, Communication and Dimitry Epstein, Communication

International policy-making in the field of information and communication technology involves numerous governmental bodies, private sector organizations, and civil society groups and is conducted primarily through a “rough consensus”. This study seeks to address two main research questions regarding how this consensus is achieved. First, it aims to understand how the agenda for global ICT policy-making is set through a continuous process of deliberation and consensus seeking. Second, it aspires to explain how frames and discursive patterns emerge in the fora where policy is discussed and how these frames and patterns portray ICTs. This research is expected to expand our theoretical thinking about the constitution of an “information society,” in which policy-making processes serve as mechanisms contributing to construction of social structures, systems, and norms. The study focuses on the ongoing global debate about internet governance and employs a single case study design where each multi-stakeholders’ meeting constitutes a unit of analysis. It is based on discourse analysis of policy statements, interviews with the stakeholders, and on observations of the Internet-policy related international meetings as discursive spaces.

Update: This research resulted in an article titled, “Who’s Responsible for the Digital Divide? Public Perceptions and Policy Implications,” in The Information Society (v27n2, 2011): 92-104.

An Exploration of the Effect of Design Interventions on Reducing Sedentary Behavior in Workplace
Ying Hua, Design & Environmental Analysis

Sedentary behavior is prevalent in today’s workplace and has been shown to have negative impact on health. The pursuit of efficiency and the permeation of modern communication and information technologies in workplaces increased prolonged sitting and physical inactivity at work, which is a major risk factor for developing obesity, depression, and a number of diseases among the white-collar workforce. Efforts to introduce deliberate exercise into workplace, such as building fitness facilities at the worksite or implementing programs to encourage walking during break time, have showed limited effects on changing behavior, especially for those who have inactive lifestyle. The challenge is how to reduce prolonged sitting and increase the activity level in the daily work patterns. The goal of the proposed research project is to understand the behavior patterns in modern workplace and the effect of workplace spatial design on the sedentary behavior of office workers, and to examine the potential of spatial design interventions to alter the immediate incentives for behavior choices in order to encourages a healthier lifestyle in today’s workplace. A multiple-tool methodology will be developed and tested in this interdisciplinary research.

Update: As of 2011, Prof. Hua conducted an extensive literature study on the topic of building’s spatial design and occupants’ walking behavior. Hua built a comprehensive matrix of indices on this topic by looking at all horizontal and vertical spatial design indicators studied and the level of detail that they have been examined. Hua has completed a report on the parameters matrix developed in the literature study and the state of knowledge and theories on the research topic, and is developing the report into a journal paper now. The findings also enabled her to propose “Workplace and Health” as one of the theme topics for an international research symposium on Future Workplace that she is participating in organizing for September 2012. Based on the literature review, Hua developed a new version of Workplace Level of Activity Survey tool for her field data collection, which integrates the frequently used International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and workplace-specific activity questions. The large-scale field data collection using this new tool on campus buildings is scheduled for Spring2012. Data analysis will follow. A typology study has been conducted on candidate campus buildings’ spatial layout and several layout types have been identified and are ready for comparisons and analysis. The field data and results from the analysis will be used in a grant proposal on workplace spatial design and healthy behavior to NIH R03 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for investigator-initiated research for external funding.

Exploring Trans-disciplinary Research in Environmental Education and Related Fields
Marianne Krasny, Natural Resources, Janis Dickinson, Natural Resources and Justin Dillon, London

The goal of this proposal is to explore new theoretical frameworks and research directions in environmental education and related fields, by creating a platform for dialogue among 24 faculty and two graduate students from diverse disciplines including environmental sociology, communication, psychology, education, and governance. The conference is part of a larger effort, which encompasses preand post-conference communications and will lead to an edited book published in 2011. The transdisciplinary theoretical frameworks emerging from dialogue among the participants have the potential to transform environmental education research at a critical juncture in its history. This project also addresses issues related to the potential for cross-disciplinary research to solve complex environmental problems and contributes to an emerging Cornell initiative on academic pluralism.

Update: This workshop, successfully held in October 2010, led to a book contract, as well as an EPA 5-year grant of $11,297,500 to conduct evaluative research on the National Environmental Education Training Program.

Engaging Images: Artists and the Art of Life in 20th Century South Africa
Daniel Magaziner, History

Engaging Artists is the story of black South African art and artists during the 20th century. Until very recently, where scholars have examined the arts in South Africa at all, they have done so reductively. The literature abounds with political readings of artistic production; poets, playwrights, artists from whatever era are read as politicians of a different name. This perspective was perhaps historically appropriate, given than most arts criticism and analysis emerged in the wake of the 1970s and 1980s struggle against apartheid, when artists, musicians and others insisted that no creativity other than creativity-in-struggle was possible. Yet most scholars have taken this outcome for granted, without adequately exploring how it came to be. Engaging Images will probe into this past, reading forward with the sweep of the 20th century to see how one group of intellectuals – visual artists – thought about what they were doing. So doing, it will offer new insights into the cultural, social and intellectual history of a time period too easily reduced to political movements and the oppressive regimes with which they grappled. Artists’ position was fraught for reasons beyond the straightforwardly political, as they confronted the expectations of their missionary and other teachers, the local and international art markets, and assumptions about what constituted appropriate African art and identities. By tracing how artists navigated this terrain, Engaging Artists will offer new insights into the intellectual challenges of black life in 20th century South Africa. By exploring the choices artists made – about subject matter, about relationships with others in society, about political engagement, about how to live their lives – it will offer a history of the actual experiences and thought that preceded the more celebrated politics of 20th century South Africa.

Update: Prof. Magaziner traveled to S. Africa, supported largely by his ISS grant. He found a wealth of material in archives there, including art gallery libraries in Johannesburg and Cape Town, as well as smaller public and private collections. He also conducted a number of interviews with working artists, gallerists, and others throughout the country.  His research so far has been the basis of two talks presented at the University of KwaZulu-Natal on 16 March 2011and the University of Pretoria on 24 March 2011. Prof. Magaziner has been awarded additional funding by the Cornell Society for the Humanities for this research.

Rethinking Development in an Age of Climate Change
Fouad Makki, Development Sociology, Shelley Feldman, Development Sociology, Charles Geisler, Development Sociology, and Phil McMichael, Development Sociology

In the shadow of the 2009 Copenhagen Summit on Climate Change, the world faces an uncertain future, combining ecological and economic crises with multilateral paralysis. In such moments of uncertainty, long-cherished beliefs about economic growth and sustainability can lose salience, legitimacy, and coherence. Arguably, this is the case today for the notion of development understood as a ‘master concept’ of the social sciences. Development’s meaning, scale, and impact are being irrevocably altered by the specter of climate change, and policy-makers, analysts and practitioners are engaged separately or together in rethinking the development paradigm. While emerging perspectives vary in focus and scope, they all recognize that development, understood as an epistemic and material response to global inequality, can no longer be addressed and practiced in isolation from climate change. Our proposal is to organize a Cornell Workshop to explore this repositioning of ‘development’ in the context of climate change. Its aim is diagnostic: to assemble a variety of analytical perspectives to identify the possibilities and limits of paradigmatic transformations in the meaning and practice of development.

Update: We established the “New Enclosures Research Working Group” leading to a workshop where papers were discussed.   Rural Sociology, the journal of the Rural Sociology section of the American Sociological Association, published a special volume in March 2014.

Linguistic and Emotional Factors in Intergroup Linguistic Bias
Poppy McLeod, Communication

This proposal seeks to develop stimuli and to conduct pilot testing of experimentalparadigms for a larger program of research being proposed for funding from the National Science Foundation (Proposal #6991180), and from the United States Department of Agriculture Hatch Foundation (USDA: Proposal #2010-11-157). This larger research program examines how intergroup bias – defined as showing preference for one’s ingroup and derogating outgroups — is reflected in differential language choices and attributions of emotions in descriptions of ingroups and outgroups. The larger research program will contribute to the literature on intergroup bias by integrating major theoretical approaches to intergroup bias that have complementary perspectives but have heretofore developed independently.

Update: Prof. McLeod’s pilot research led to a $81,448 three-year grant from the USDA Hatch Foundation to study language use in public controversies, such as NYS natural gas drilling,

Kin and Kingdom: Using GIS to understand the relationship between tribes and elections in Jordan
David Patel, Government

Why do “tribal” candidates in the Arab world win parliamentary seats in some districts, but not others? Why can some tribes, but not others, coordinate members’ votes in a way to maximize their chance of winning, and why do clan identities sometimes trump tribal ones? I seek to understand how tribes affect electoral politics and the extent to which electoral politics reinforce or even redefine tribal identities. I hypothesize that voters select the level of tribal identity that puts them in a minimum winning coalition and that gerrymandering and electoral rules can therefore reshape what level of the tribal pyramid is politically relevant. To assess this hypothesis and alternative explanations, I will build a
GIS geospatial database of Jordanian tribal boundaries, their constituent segments’ areas (i.e., clans, lineages, extended families), electoral districts, and candidates for parliament from five elections from 1989‐2007. I seek support from the ISS Small Grant Program for 1) training in GIS software at Cornell, and 2) travel to Jordan to collect these data on tribes, tribal boundaries, and parliamentary candidates.

Update: Prof. Patel’s research in Jordan has resulted in the working paper titled, “From Islamic to Ethnic Politics in Jordan.”

Fluid Empires: Water Management across the French Mediterranean
Sara Pritchard, Science & Technology Studies
Co-sponsored with generous support by the Einaudi Center

My second book-length project, Fluid Empires: Water Management across the French Mediterranean, explores the development and circulation of experts, knowledge, and technologies related to water management between France and its North African colonies and protectorates (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia) since the late nineteenth century. This study thus examines imperialism and postcoloniality through social scientific investigation of science, technology, and environmental management. In particular, it considers the entwined political, economic, technical, and ecological relationships between France and French North Africa both during and after colonialism through the lens of water and its regulation. This new research is an outgrowth of my earlier work, both historically and theoretically, while addressing important new dimensions, including colonialism, postcoloniality, and globalization. More broadly, it reflects my work at the intersection of science and technology studies (S&TS), the history of science and technology, environmental history, and the historical discipline more broadly. Furthermore, this project contributes to several wider themes within the social sciences: it 1) foregrounds the role of technoscientific and environmental “expertise” in colonial and postcolonial societies; 2) interrogates the relationship between bodies of water and political governance (especially in colonial settings); 3) historicizes the politics of “development” (paying particular attention to the French case); and 4) helps contextualize contemporary water policy and legislation around the globe today.

Update: This research resulted in a 2012 article titled, From Hydroimperialism to Hydrocapitalism: ‘French’ Hydraulics in France, North Africa, and Beyond, published in the journal Social Studies of Science. Media coverage includes: ISS’ Land Project Team Member and Small Grant Awardee, Sara Pritchard, Edits Book, “New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies” (2014).

Estimating the Impact of Alternative Canopy Management Practices on White
Wine Purchase Decisions 

Todd Schmit, Applied Economics and Management, Bradley Rickard, Applied Economics and Management, and Anna Mansfield, Food Science

Because of the correlation between wine flavor properties and per-bottle price, research and extension efforts in the New York State have focused increasingly on improving white wine flavor qualities and wine grape potential. In addition, efforts to reduce chemical use by wine grape growers through improved canopy management practices may result in wines with differing characteristics and, thus, effect the valuation of that wine by consumers. To fulfill the dual goals of developing best management practices for growers and improving flavor quality, the key chemosensory attributes of wines that correlate with increased consumer demand must be well-defined. Additionally, if alternative practices to produce wines with specific flavor profiles are known, growers/winemakers must consider all of the costs and the benefits. Knowledge of both the desirable sensory attributes in wines and the expected return to growers or winemakers for achieving these qualities can be used to guide production decisions. This project will address these issues by estimating how the variation in a wines’ sensory profile due to alternative canopy management practices affect a buyers’ willingness to pay and provide recommendations to white wine grape growers and winemakers to enhance decision-making acuity for vineyard management and winemaking decisions.

Update: As of 2012, Todd Schmit’s research led to a presentation titled Consumer Premiums for Environmentally Friendly Production Practices in New York Wines, given at several venues including the 2011 Agriculture and Applied Economics Meeting. The Chronicle has also covered his work in relation to the Cornell course on Sustainability and Organic Grape and Wine Production in an article, “Sustainable Sipping: New York Produces Eco-friendly Wines.” Other press coverage, includes: “Economists Rickard and Schmit, ISS’ Small Grant Awardees (Spring 2010), Explore ‘Loca-Pouring’ of Wines” (2013) and “Todd Schmit, an ISS’ Small Grant Award Recipient, Conducts Study Investigating Food Hubs’ Support for Local Economy” (2014).

Eating Network Partners 
Jeffrey Sobal, Nutritional Science, Matthew Brashears, Sociology, and Karla Hanson, Nutritional Science

Everyone eats, and eating is often a social activity. Research suggests that the social context of eating influences the type and amount of food that people consume. However, little is currently known about networks of eating partners, a gap that this project seeks to help fill by acquiring unique data, constructing a data set, and conducting analyses that examine prevalence and patterns of eating network partners in the U.S. Social network analysis offers the potential to understand eating network ties, but full network analysis requires much time and expense to collect data from all network members. We propose to use time use survey data that identifies episodes of activity and also who was present with the respondent in each episode. We will analyze the large, contemporary, and nationally representative 2006/2007 American Time Use Survey (ATUS) that includes 25,191 respondents age 15 and older. The analysis will 1) identify types of eating network partners, 2) measure the strength of ties to eating network partners, 3) examine combinations of eating network partners and develop a typology of eating network partner classes, 4) describe the diversity of eating network partner classes, and 5) characterize demographic differences across partners and classes. This project will advance social network analysis by employing time use data to assess ego-networks, and also will provide new insights about the sociology of eating relevant to nutrition, and health. Our findings have the potential to motivate a new focus on with whom people eat as a novel pathway that shifts thinking beyond the traditional focus upon what and how much people eat that has potential for encouraging healthy eating. This initial ATUS analysis will be published and will provide a foundation for seeking external funding for more comprehensive analysis of eating network partners.

Update: As of 2012, his research has been delayed and is in the data analysis stage.

The Causal Mechanisms of the Democratic Peace
Jessica Weeks, Government and Michael Tomz, Stanford University

The project’s goal is to increase our understanding of the past, current, and future effects of democratic institutions on international conflict. To do this, the project will substantially increase the quality and quantity of data about the causes of military conflict.  There are two main components to the proposal. The first component involves building a revised version of the widely-used Militarized Interstate Disputes (MID) Dataset. The second component consists of a series of survey experiments designed to identify how and why regime type and other factors affect citizens’ support for using military force abroad.  This research project will result in several publications, an online database, and will offer research and learning opportunities to undergraduate and graduate students. The project is jointly implemented with Michael Tomz, Professor of Political Science at Stanford University.

Update: Prof. Weeks’ research has led to two additional grants from the Cornell Affinito-Stewart program (2011) and Smith Richardson Foundation (2010). Her book manuscript is titled, Dictators at War. Press coverage includes: Two ISS small grant PIs Receive 2011 Affinito-Stewart Grants and Government’s Jessica Weeks Wins Grant for Book on War

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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