Poverty Courses

Fall 2011: Economic Development: Firms, Industries, and Regions (CRP 4170/5170)
Susan Christopherson 

Fall 2011: Social Inequality (SOC 5180)
Stephen Morgan

Spring 2011: Compensation, Incentives, and Productivity (ILRLE 4430)
Matthew Freedman

Spring 2011: Development Microeconomics Graduate Research Seminar (AEM 7650)
Chris Barrett

Spring 2011: Economic and Community Development Workshop: Elmira (CRP 5074)
Susan Christopherson 

Spring 2011: Economics of Wages & Employment (ILRLE 2400)
Matthew Freedman

Spring 2011:  Schooling, Racial Inequality, and Public Policy in America (SOC 3570)
Stephen Morgan 

Fall 2010: Contemporary Controversies in the Global Economy (AEM 2000)
Chris Barrett

Fall 2010:  Controversies About Inequality (SOC 2220; also DSOC/ILROB/PAM 2220, GOVT 2225, PHIL 1950)
Stephen Morgan 

Fall 2010: Development Microeconomics Graduate Research Seminar (AEM 7650)
Chris Barrett

Fall 2010: Economic Development: Firms, Industries and Regions (CRP 4170/5170)
Susan Christopherson 

Fall 2010: Food Systems for Poverty Reduction: Concepts and Themes (IARD 6040/AEM 6040)
Chris Barrett

Fall 2010: People, Markets, and Democracy (GOVT 6274)
Chris Anderson 

Spring 2010: Market Information and Food Insecurity Response Analysis (MIFIRA) Framework (AEM 6940)
Chris Barrett and Erin Lentz

Spring 2010: Comparative Perspectives in Poverty Reduction Policy (AEM 4551/CrP6490/SOC4450)
Chris Barrett and Susan Christopherson

This course aims to build student awareness and understanding of facts about poverty domestically and internationally and of different policies intended to reduce the incidence and persistence of poverty. The course exposes students to different disciplinary and geographic perspectives on issues of poverty dynamics and socioeconomic mobility and to the evidence on different policy interventions. Sponsored by the Institute for the Social Sciences 2008-11 theme project on Persistent Poverty and Upward Mobility.

Spring 2010: Development Microeconomics Graduate Research Seminar (AEM 7650)
Chris Barrett

Spring 2010: Schooling, Racial Inequality, and Public Policy in America (SOC 3570)
Stephen Morgan 

Spring 2010: Compensation, Incentives, and Productivitiy (ILRLE 4430)
Matthew Freedman

Fall 2009: Development Microeconomics Graduate Research Seminar (AEM 7650)
Chris Barrett

Fall 2009: Social Inequality: Contemporary Theories, Debates, and Models (SOC 5180)
Stephen Morgan 

Fall 2009: Economics of Wages & Employment (ILRLE 2400)
Matthew Freedman

Applies the theory and elementary tools of economics to the characteristics and problems of the labor market. Considers both the demand (employer) and supply (employee) sides of the market to gain a deeper understanding of the effects of various government programs and private decisions targeted at the labor market. Topics include employment demand, basic compensation determination, education and training, benefits and the structure of compensation, labor-force participation and its relation to household production, occupational choice, migration, labor-market discrimination, and the effects of unions. 

Spring 2009: Health, Poverty and Inequality: A Global Perspective (NS 4570)
David Sahn

Spring 2009: Empirical Methods for the Analysis of Household Survey Data: Applications to Health, Education and Poverty (ECON 7711)
David Sahn

Spring 2009: Controversies About Inequality Course (SOC 2220; also DSOC/ILROB/PAM 2220, GOVT 2225, PHIL 1950)
Stephen Morgan 

Introduces students to contemporary debates and controversies about the underlying structure of inequality, the processes by which it is generated and maintained, the mechanisms through which it comes to be viewed as legitimate, natural, or inevitable, and the forces making for change and stability in inequality regimes. These topics are addressed through readings, class discussion, visiting lectures from distinguished scholars of inequality, and debates staged between students who take opposing positions on pressing inequality-relevant issues (e.g., welfare reform, school vouchers, immigration policy, affirmative action).

Spring 2009: Economic Development, State and Local Policy (CRP 4170/5170)
Susan Christopherson

Economic development policy in the United States has focused historically on the provision of subsidies to individual firms. As the limitations of this strategy have become more apparent, alternative approaches including multifirm and workforce development are being implemented. This comparative course draws on cases from a variety of industries and national contexts. Particular attention is paid to economic development issues and policies in New York State.

Fall 2008: Contemporary Controversies in the Global Economy (AEM 2000)
Chris Barrett

Aims to stimulate critical thinking and cogent writing and speaking about contemporary controversies that attract regular attention in the international press and among key private and public sector decision-makers. Students read and discuss competing arguments about current issues such as patenting and pricing of pharmaceuticals worldwide, controls on commercial and humanitarian distribution of genetically modified foods, and immigration restrictions. Students write a series of short briefing papers and give regular oral briefs, which are evaluated for quality of communication and content.

Fall 2008: Microeconomics of International Development (AEM 7620)
Chris Barrett and Felix Naschold

Focuses on models of individual, household, firm/farm, and market behavior in low- and middle-income developing economies. Topics include agricultural land, labor, and financial institutions; technology adoption; food security and nutrition; risk management; intra-household analysis; reciprocity networks; and product/factor markets analysis. Emphasizes empirical research.

Fall 2008-Spring 2010: Development Microeconomics Graduate Research Seminar (AEM 7650)
Chris Barrett

Graduate students and the instructor present draft research proposals, papers, and preliminary thesis results for group review and discussion. Students who actively participate by offering written and oral comments on others’ work receive 1 credit. Students who also present their own proposal or paper receive 2 credits. Presentations last 75 minutes and thus represent a substantial investment of time. Students who present a second proposal or paper receive 3 credits.

Fall 2008: Seminar in Labor Economics (ILRLE 7450/ECON 7420)
Matthew Freedman and Kevin Hallock

Includes reading and discussion of selected topics in labor economics. Stresses applications of economic theory and econometrics to the labor market and human resource areas.

Fall 2008 Inequality Concentration Electives