Judgment Seminars

Related Speaker Series

Behavioral Workshops (BEDR Workshop & Behavioral Economics Workshop)
Law Psychology and Human Development Speaker Series

Past Seminars

April 11, 2013
Stereotype Threat: How It Affects Us and What We Can Do About It
Claude M. Steele, James Quillen Dean of the Graduate School of Education, Stanford University
3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.; Alice Statler Auditorium

March 27, 2013

How Behavioral Economics Can Improve Public Policies and Employment Programs for Youth
3:00 p.m.

November 30, 2012
 A Social Neuroscience Perspective on Adolescent Risk Taking
Laurence Steinberg, Psychology, Temple University
2:15 p.m.; MVR G-71

November 2, 2012
BEDR Workshop Series 
How Sex Ratio Affects Saving, Borrowing, and Spending
Vladas Griskevicius, Assistant Professor of Marketing, University of Minnesota
9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. B08 Sage Hall

July 25, 2012
RF Coil Development for In Vivo MRI Applications
Ye Li, University of California, San Francisco and MRI Physicist Candidate
10:30 a.m.-11:15 a.m. 153 Martha Van Rensselaer Hall

July 24, 2012
T2‐Prepared Inversion Recovery Sequence for Flow‐Insensitive Vessel Wall Imaging &
Design of a Transmit/ Receive Array for 7T Shoulder Imaging. 

Ryan Brown, New York University Medical Center and MRI Physicist Candidate
10:30 a.m.-11:15 a.m. 153 Martha Van Rensselaer Hall 

March 28, 2012
Capstone Lecture
Judgment, Decision Making, and Social Behavior

Ron Seeber, VP for the Social Sciences, will give introductory remarks
4:30-6:00 p.m., 423 ILR Conference Center

March 1, 2012
Book Talk: The Adolescent Brain: Learning, Reasoning and Decision Making
Valerie ReynaAuthor, ISS Judgment Team Member & Law Professor
4:00 p.m. 160 Mann Library

November 28, 2011 Co-sponsored ISS Judgment Event
The Darwin Economy
Robert Frank, ISS Judgment Team Member & Prof. of Management
4:45 p.m. 233 Plant Science

September 22-23, 2011
The Third Biennial Urie Bronfenbrenner Conference
The Neuroscience of Risky Decision Making

102 Mann Library (off the lobby) 
Sponsored by the Center for Behavioral Economics and Decision Research (Financial and logistical support from the Institute for the Social Sciences, the Cornell University Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research and the Cornell University Office of the Dean of the College of Human Ecology)

September 21, 2011
George Staller Lecture
Studying Behavioral Economics in Strange Places: From the National Football League to Deal or No Deal
Richard Thaler, Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics at the University of Chicago
4:30 p.m., G01 Uris Hal

May 3, 2011
No Margin, No Mission? A Field Experiment on Incentives for Pro-Social Tasks 
Nava Ashraf, Harvard University
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop 

April 29, 2011
The George Staller Lecture 

Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Fight Against Global Poverty
Esther Duflo, MIT
4:00 p.m., 305 Ives Hall
and the Department of Economics 

April 28, 2011, CANCELLED
Happiness on Tap: Piped Water Adoption in Urban Morocco 
Esther Duflo, MIT
4:25 p.m., B05 Sage Hall
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop 

April 26, 2011
The Neurobiology of Loss Aversion and Reference-Dependency

Benedetto De Martino, University College London
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop 

April 20, 2011
Public Lecture

How Best to Incorporate Psychology into Economics 
Matthew Rabin, UC Berkeley
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m., 305 Ives Hall


April 19, 2011
A Model of Non-Belief in the Law of Large Numbers

Matthew Rabin, UC Berkeley
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., 423 ILR Conference Center
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop 

April 12, 2011
Three Problems In (Or Is That “With”?) Behavioral Economics 
Daniel Gilbert, Harvard
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; B09 Sage Hall
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop
Behavioral Economics does a splendid job of describing the ways in which human behavior violates rationality, but does a less splendid job of explaining why these violations occur. I will describe recent data suggesting that we may have misunderstood some old phenomena (the endowment effect and temporal discounting) and failed to notice some new ones (temporal asymmetry).

April 13, 2011
Public Lecture

Four Things Your Mother Didn’t Tell You About Happiness
Daniel Gilbert, Harvard
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.; 305 Ives Hall

Most of us think we know what would make us happy and that the only real problem in life is getting it. But research suggests that people are not all that good at predicting what will make them happy, how happy it will make them, and how long that happiness will last. I will explain why, when it comes to finding happiness, we can’t always trust our imaginations — or our mothers.

April 5, 2011
How Many Pears Would a Pear Packer Pack if a Pear Packer Could Pack Pears at Quasi-Exogenously Varying Piece Rates?
Tom Chang, USC Marshall
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop 

March 29 , 2011
Everyday Magical Beliefs: Investing in Karma and Reversing One’s Fortune
Jane Risen, Chicago
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop 

March 8 , 2011
The Temporal Discrimination Effect:  An Audit Study in Academia
Katherine Milkman, Penn
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop 

March 3, 2011
The Psychology of Poverty 
Sendhil Mullainathan, Harvard University
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m., Statler Auditorium

How can we alleviate poverty? This questions tugs at nearly everyone’s conscience. Social science breaks this down to more scientific ones. Why do people stay poor? Do the poor behave in ways that reinforce poverty? If so, why? Answers to these questions are both of scientific and practical interest since they can also help us design policies and interventions. This talk takes a radically different perspective on these questions. I argue that a different kind of psychology operates under conditions of scarcity. People choose, behave and feel differently when they have very little. Using data as diverse as lab experiments on undergraduates in Princeton or field studies on poor farmers in Tamil Nadu, I illustrate the psychology of scarcity. I provide some implications for its starkest predictions, such as the fact that living under conditions of poverty reduces mental capacity.

March 1, 2011
Self-Control at Work: Evidence from a Field Experiment
Sendhil Mullainathan, Harvard University
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., B01 Sage Hall
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop 

February 22, 2011
A Behavioral Science Approach to Voter Mobilization
Todd Rogers, Analyst Institute
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop 

December 17, 2010

JDSB Neuroscience Workshop
Barbara Ganzel, Human Development, Cornell University
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)

December 15, 2010
JDSB Neuroscience Workshop
Wendy Kates and Ioana ComanThe Center for Psychiatric Neuroimaging, SUNY Upstate Medical University
1:00 – 4:00 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room) 

December 8, 2010
Nonstandard Preference and Irrational Behavior on Auctions:
New Evidence from the Field

Henry Schneider, JGSM, Cornell University
1:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)

November 30, 2010
Good News-Bad News Effect 
Justin Rao, Yahoo! Research
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 423 ILR Conference Center (Note Location)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop

November 23, 2010
Reason-Based Choice: A Bargaining Rationale for the Attraction and Compromise Effects
Kfir Eliaz, Brown University
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop

November 16, 2010
The Dual Nature of Uncertainty: A Behavioral Perspective
Craig Fox, UCLA
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop

November 9, 2010
An Endowment Effect for Risk: Experimental Tests of Stochastic Reference Points
Charles Sprenger, UC San Diego
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop

November 2, 2010
Race Effects on EBay 

Christine Jolls, Yale University
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop

October 26, 2010
Voters, Dictators, and Peons: Expressive Voting and Pivotality 
Emir Kamenica, University of Chicago
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop

October 18, 2010
Social influence: The Remarkable Rule of Reciprocation
Robert Cialdini, Arizona State University
4:30 p.m., Alice Statler Auditorium
 
In his lecture, Professor Cialdini describes six “universal principles of social influence” that, if incorporated into a persuasive appeal significantly increase the likelihood of success.  He then focuses on one of those principles, reciprocation, and provides evidence of its ability to elevate the extent to which individuals will undertake environmentally sound action, volunteer for community service, and even leave a dramatically larger tip for servers in a restaurant.  Practical and ethical considerations are discussed.

October 19, 2010
Norms-based messaging: An untapped power source for environmental action
Robert Cialdini, Arizona State University
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; 423 ILR Conference Center
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop 
Decision-makers can focus too much on economic factors when seeking to motivate others.  Cialdini argues they would be well advised to also consider what is known about social psychological motivators such as social norms, which his research indicates can be at least as effective as financial inducements/punishments in mobilizing desired conduct and yet substantially less expensive to implement.

October 4, 2010
Judgment by the Numbers: Converting Qualitative to Quantitative Judgments in Law
423 ILR Conference Center
Cosponsored Empirical Legal Studies at the Cornell Law School

October 5, 2010
The Answer to the Riddle of Induction
Reid Hastie, University of Chicago
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop

September 28, 2010
The Effect of Providing Peer Information on Retirement Savings Decisions
John Beshears, Stanford University
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop

September 24, 2010
Law, Psychology, & Human Development Seminar
“Envy Up, Scorn Down: How Status Divides Us”
Susan Tufts Fiske, Psychology, Princeton University
2:15 -3:30 p.m., G87 Martha Van
Status-comparison compels people, even as it stresses, depresses, and divides us. Comparison is only natural, but the collateral damage reveals envy upward and scorn downward, which arguably poison people and their relationships. Several experiments—using questionnaire, psychometric, response-time, electro-myographic, and neuroimaging data—illustrate the dynamics of envy up and scorn down, as well as proposing how to mitigate their effects. Initial studies suggest the importance of status. Other data show how scorn down minimizes thought about another’s mind; power deactivates mental concepts. Turning to envy up, other studies demonstrate that Schadenfreude (malicious joy) targets envied outgroups. However, counter-stereotypic information, empathy, and outcome dependency can mitigate both scorn and envy. 

September 21, 2010
Multiplicity, Uncertainty, Reference-Dependence & the Endowment Effect
Yuval Rottenstreich, NYU
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m. 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room) 
Cosponsored with the BEDR Workshop

September 14, 2010
The Nature of Risk Preferences: Evidence from Insurance Choices
Ted O’Donoghue, Cornell University
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop

September 10, 2010
Some Thoughts on Neuroeconomics and Choice Theory

Ariel Rubinstein, Tel Aviv University
3:30 – 5:00 p.m., 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BE Workshop

August 31, 2010
A Sparsity-Based Model of Bounded Rationality
Xavier Gabaix, New York University
11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m. 146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)
Cosponsored with the BEDR/BE Workshop
This paper proposes and analyzes a model of bounded rationality based on the following principles: the decision-maker (DM) behaves like an economist who builds a simplified representation of the world. Crucially, this representation is “sparse,” i.e. uses few parameters that are non-zero, or differ from the usual state of affairs. The DM may imperfectly maximize, based again on a penalty related to sparsity. Complexity is measured by the lack of sparsity, and in a way that still leads to well-behaved, convex maximization problems. The model is a tractable algorithm that can be applied with paper and pencil in many situations of interest. I apply it to a variety of prototypical economic or game-theoretic situations: hitting a target with selective attention; maximization of consumption utility subject to a budget constraint, but with imperfect understanding of prices; life-cycle consumption problems; epiphanies; endowment effect; portfolio choice problems with stocks and flows; “buying the plant” problem; centipede game; the dollar auction game. I conclude that the model may be a useful proposal for tractable analysis of bounded rationality in economic situations.

June 7, 2010
Workshop
Social/Moral Preferences and Behavior Workshop
225 ILR Conference Center

May 13-14, 2010
Conference

Behavioral Economics Conference
Cosponsored by Russell-Sage Foundation, NIA, and ISS JDSB team
By invitation only

April 28, 2010
Kick-off Lecture 
Judgment, Decision Making and Social Behavior 
4:30-6:00 p.m., 423 ILR Conference Center
Please join us for this lecture introducing the 2009-2012 theme project. Ted O’Donoghue, Team Leader and Professor of Economics will discuss the team’s key research questions, specific research projects, and public activities. Team members will be on hand for Q & A following the lecture.

March 5, 2010
Dual Process Approaches to Human Judgment and Behavior 
12:30 – 5:00
146 Myron Taylor Hall (ISS Conference Room)

September 29, 2009
Framing Punishment: A New Look at Incarceration and Deterrence
Emily Owens, Prof., Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell
3:00 p.m., The Rushmore Room, MVR 114
Sponsored by PAM 
We present empirical evidence to support the role of framing, a component of prospect theory, in the criminal decision making process. Taking advantage of a 2001 legal change that altered recommended, but not actual, punishments for certain offenses, we find that individuals whose punishments were low relative to potential punishment were five percentage points more likely to be rearrested, and were rearrested twenty percent sooner than those whose potential punishments were high. Our results suggest that behavioral economic modeling of criminal decision making may help evaluate criminal justice policy, and that incarceration can potentially be used in a more cost effective way.